The peculiarities in Christian names are not as likely as to mislead as differences in surnames- but may be thrown out of their proper place in an index or escape notice altogether, or, if seen might be taken to refer to some other person.

The peculiarities in Christian names in Ireland may be divided into five classes:

  1. Names applicable to both sexes
  2. Names usually given to one sex, but applied to the other
  3. Diminutives materially differing from the original names
  4. Names which are different but for varied reasons are used interchangeably
  5. Irish equivalents for English names and English equivalents for Irish names
1. NAMES APPLICABLE TO BOTH SEXES:

Surnames given at baptism as Christian names frequently by Protestants and sometimes applied to both sexes.

2. NAMES USUALLY GIVEN TO ONE SEX-BUT APPLIED TO THE OTHER:

All confused due to their slight differences.

3. DIMINUTIVES MATERIALLY DIFFERING FROM THE ORIGINAL NAMES: 4. NAMES WHICH ARE DIFFERENT BUT FOR VARIED REASONS ARE USED INTERCHANGEABLY: 5. THE IRISH OR ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS OF ONE ANOTHER:

But not necessarily being a correct translation of such names.

The correct or standard translation of such Irish names as Sean-John; Seamus- James etc., can be found in a good Irish-English lexicon.

Until the end of the mid 18th C it was unusual for a child to receive more than one Christian name in Ireland although there were some standard favourite combinations such as Ann Jane, Mary Anne. Even in the 19th C the practise of giving a second Christian name was slowly adopted....starting with the richer gentry.

6. Favourite Catholic Christian names were:

For boys:
John, Patrick, James, Denis, William, Darby, Dermot, Daniel, Cornelius, Henry, Timothy, Thomas, Michael, Jeremiah, Bartholomew, Brian, Laurence, Thady, Terence, Owen, Martin, Mathias, David and Jospeh.

Dominick enjoyed vogue in the 17thC..Columb, Malachy, Miles, Felix, Ambrose and Stanislaus were less commonly used. Aloysius is rare before the 19thC.

For girls:
Mary, Catherine, Bridget, Honora, Margaret, Ellen, Anastasia, Johanna, Judith, Julia, Rosanna, Maryanne, Elizabeth and Jane. Less common were Magdalen Monica and Theresa. Marcella is found in Ireland but is rare in England.

7. Protestants were more varied:

Boys names were:
Arthur, John, Henry, James, William, Frederick, George, Edward, Richard, Charles, Philip, Oliver, Jonathan, Anthony, Andrew, Simon, Marmaduke and Stephen. They also used old testament names which were rarely used by Catholics such as Abraham, Jacob, Moses, Isaac, Samuel, Joshua, Gamaliel.

Favourite Protestant girls names seem to have been:
Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, Eleanor, Lucy, Catherine, Susanna, Hannah, Margaret, Jane, Isabella, Frances and Alice.

Less frequently: Barbara, Gertrude, Dorothea, Charlote, Diana, Rebecca, Lydia , Grace, Phoebe, Henrietta, Lettice, Ursula, Penelope, Esther and Heather.

8. Some Regional Naming Practices were:

9. Latin

Baptisms and marriages were recorded in either Latin or English. Never in Irish. Generally where English was more common English was used and Latin was in Irish speaking parishes. There is however, no consistency. The Latin version of the first name was given while the surname and placename were still written in English.

Latin Name: English Equivalent (s)